0

Despite a somewhat amateurish air, the film is well narrated, fast-paced and to-the-point with some great visuals from award-winning filmmaker Ondi Timoner; a decent watch if you don’t have a lot of time but want to see something educational. Information comes thick and fast but the parts that stick certainly leave an impression.

More
0

You have probably heard of singer, actor and dancer Jimmie Earl Perry. Dig a little deeper and you find that Perry has worked with the likes of Luther Vandross, Celine Dion, and Leonard Bernstein and many others. But how many of us knew that this charismatic, American born artist is now a professor atStellenboschUniversity’s Africa Centre for HIV/AIDS Management.

More
0

When it comes to cocktails I am more of an aficionado than a mixer, but I can make one really good one: a Cosmopolitan. Made famous by the series Sex and the City, a Cosmopolitan is a favourite amongst the pink drink dandies. But as I found, Amarula and clear liquids do not mix too well. Unabashed, I set out to find a new cocktail.

More
0

In Janice Honeyman’s Director’s Note in the programme she uses a lot of exclamation marks. Doodsnikke is! that! good!

Doodsnikke is a dramatic adaptation of Sam Shepard‘s Buried Child which won a Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1979. This South African version – the story of a dysfunctional Northern Cape farming family and their heartbreaking secret – is sure to win some prizes of its own.

More
0

Whilst educating his audience on cooking processes and ingredients, he cracked jokes and told stories, laughing at his sister’s attempts to make mayonnaise “from eggs kept in the fridge – imagine!” (cue: laughter from audience while everyone makes a mental note: Remove Eggs from Fridge when Home) and he advocated the use of using your fingers to taste… hygiene be damned, we’re in the country now. He made the process of cooking – daunting to so many – look fun, easy and seamless. And it was, of course, so much better than watching a TV chef, not least because it was all real time with no outtakes. And then of course there were the smells…

More
0

In a refreshingly neo-classical style, the choreography accentuates the rippling effects of the upper body unfolding into extreme back extensions. The dance vocabulary as a whole stresses the importance of line, as the pictures created by the five couples are multi-dimensional.

More
1

What distinguishes Kamers from many other markets is the beautifully styled stalls. Even if the products are not to one’s taste, the way they are lit and displayed is imaginative and innovative, greatly adding to the pleasures of browsing.

More
1

The smash hit musical by Willy Russell, which was the third longest running play on London’s West End, has made its triumphant debut in Cape Town. For the first time ever, Willy Russell has allowed an adaptation of the original story, moving it from a setting in Liverpool to one in Cape Town, thanks to some masterful persuasion from renowned South African director David Kramer.

More
0

The rugby theme is just the patch of grass from which a much bigger debate is kicked off. Each of the 24 actors on stage represents a different voice of the South African psyche. In particular, the voice of the South African male. And in this group, the focus is on the white Afrikaner male. This is a demographic that once had the most powerful voice in South Africa. With the fall of apartheid – many would argue – Afrikaner men were emasculated. Much of Balbesit revolves around the lost and faded voice of the Afrikaner man and questions where he stands today.

More
0

There were bubbles. There was smoke. There was snow and fireworks. Disney on Ice commemorates 100 years of magic in one ice escapade. This was a trip down memory lane with your favourite childhood characters.

More
0

‘Rock star’ and ‘cellist’ are not normally heard uttered in the same breath. Except, that is, in the case of the phenomenally talented (and easy on the eye) Zuill Bailey.

More
0

This mesmerizing and inspiring performance proves the possibilities between able and disabled bodies to narrow the gap and form an integrated community. Unmute leaves the audience visually in awe and emotionally vulnerable.

More
0

It is a fun, light-hearted production, which celebrates the shallowness in each one of us while recognizing the basic faults which make us human.

More
1

There were some obscure questions, some questions to which we knew the answers but for the life of us couldn’t remember, and some really easy ones that had us all gabbling in whispers. But at the end of the night you realise it’s not really about whether you get all the questions right, it’s about the fun you have trying to answer them.

More
0

Up The Creek isn’t just about its river (okay 99.01%). It also throws together diverse artists for some killer collaborations. Al Bairre and a few of the guys from Nomadic Orchestra performed a bouncy mashup of ‘Walking on Sunshine’ and Beyonce’s ‘Halo’. Bandolero can only be described as a dynamic musical extravaganza

More
0

The range and depth of her visionary spectrum is quite astonishing. In nightmarishly illustrative essays on the industrial components of the mining industry, she summons up the deadly beauty of smelters, capacitors and convertors using hand-made pastels derived from metal wastes.

More
0

As the sun went down, so did the dreamy optimism. Modest Mouse – the most anticipated act of the night – changed the mood with their feisty, this-is-how-it-is confidence.

More
1

It’s important to note that the Wine Tram is a slight misnomer. In fact most of the travelling between wine estates takes place in a 1920s-style bus, painted in the same British racing green livery as the tram. The tram itself – which is obviously a highlight – runs on the original track from 1904 between the Franschhoek station and Rickety Bridge wine estate, via Grande Provence wine estate.

More
1

“It demands high energy, and the ability to sing and dance with utter conviction. And I must say, the cast members are immensely talented and enthusiastic.”

More
2

Three incredibly real, raw, honest and achingly beautiful acts in a venue filled with the secrets and whispers of the thousands of people who have crossed its threshold over the past hundred years. Pure magic.

More
1

Kirstenbosch Summer Concerts hosted the 9th Cape Town Folk ‘n Acoustic Music Festival, featuring a plethora of mostly South African artists and a range of genres, from bluegrass and folk to Cape jazz. The festival included Fruit Vendor, Rory Eliot, Natasha Meister, Farryl Purkiss, Majozi, Touchwood, Basson Laubscher, Crimson House, BlackByrd, Blues Broers, Manouche, Donovan Copley and Kahn Morbee. It’s great to see the variety of popular and up-and-coming South African talent out there, although the fact that each artist only got to perform two songs interrupted the flow of the evening and prevented any real audience–artist interaction.

More
1

He doesn’t care much for an audience, only really to sing. And play. He performs songs he loves, and you’re welcome to listen. Or not. The songs don’t care.

More
0

“As the characters become more clearly defined, they swing between humour, pathos, and wonder as adroitly as Eric Ksouri’s foreboding score. Most memorable, though, is the seamless intertwining of choreography, acting and puppetry.”

More
0

“Wine tasting stations were set beneath log structures, and charming seating areas were made up of logs, boles, checked table cloths and buckets of freshly picked apples.”

More